Saturday, February 16, 2019

Chengdu Could Not, Would Not Fall Asleep by Barney Saltzberg

Chengdu Could Not, Would Not Fall Asleep by Barney Saltzberg was published in 2014. I discovered this book because Aria received one for Christmas, so I went right over to Seagull Book and bought one for my library.

This is such a cute bedtime or anytime book. Chengdu is a panda and the look on his face is just what I imagine I look like when I can not fall asleep.

The book begins with everyone in the bamboo patch being asleep except for Chengdu. He turns, he tosses, and he twitches, "but he could not, would not fall asleep."There are fold out pages that show the things that Chengdu does to try to get himself to sleep. When at last he gets to sleep, there is someone else still awake.

This is a cute book with a surprise at the end and the art is darling.




Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

The Book of Mistakes by Corinna Luyken

I found an absolutely beautiful picture book called The Book of Mistakes by Corinna Luyken. Published in 2017, this book has few words, but the art is fantastic. The first page reads, "It started" and the facing page has the picture of a half drawn face. The next page says, "with one mistake." and the facing page shows the face more drawn but with one eye way too big. 

"Making the other eye even bigger was another mistake." Now the face is more drawn and the eyes still don't match. 

The next page says, "But the glasses - they were a good idea."

Each page shows and tells which things were mistakes and which things were good ideas as each page gets more and more detailed with beautiful illustrations that often look like ink, but they have splashes of color. The book ends at the beginning in a magical, beautiful way. 


I love this book because it shows that it's okay to mess up and often our biggest and best ideas come from other ideas that didn't quite work out the way we hoped.







Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy was published in 1891 and is forward thinking for its time. I read this years ago and recently re-read it. 

Tess is from a working class family. Her father is a peddler and a hard drinker, and his drinking causes her to need to work for a family who her father believes is related to them, but in reality they are not. Alec ends up raping Tess and a child is created by this attack. 

In her time period, she is considered ruined. Alec wants to love and keep her, but she despises him. Because she will not marry him, she is viewed as the one at fault. 

She moves away from her home and works on a farm where she meets Angel Clare, a man who would be her savoir but will he accept the truth of her past?

This book frustrates me to no end. The views of society toward women at that time were so much worse than they are today. All of the men in this book, except for the farmer who she works for when she first leaves home, need a good shaking. They are selfish and products of their time, but it makes them cold, heartless, and more grief is caused than needs to be. 

The ending of the book was not unexpected, but like the first time I read it, it makes me angry. 

This book is well written and worth reading. 






Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Bad News for Outlaws by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie was published in 2009 and won the Coretta Scott King award. I am a sucker for books about people, places, or things I've never heard of, and because this is a picture book with amazing pictures, it came home with me.

The subtitle of this book is: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal. I'd never heard of him. He was a Black Deputy U.S Marshal during a time when many white people did not like the idea of Black Americans being anything other than servants or slaves.

Bass Reeves was a slave. He escaped his owner (that is so awful for a human to be owned) during the Civil War and hid in Indian Territory. He was accepted by some of the tribes. After the Civil War, he and his wife moved to Arkansas just outside Indian Territory and had eleven children.

Squatters and other outlaws went into Indian Territory even though it was illegal for them to be there. They wanted government protection even though they were breaking the law. Bass Reeves became a deputy for Judge Isaac C Parker, and Reeves never failed to get his man.

Reeves was taller and stronger than the average man. He was a crack shot with a gun, so much so that he was banned from entering contests at fairs and picnics. He always tried to capture the fugitives he hunted alive. He was incredibly intelligent and found ways to capture fugitives without injury to himself or others. In the course of hunting down and arresting over 3,000 fugitives, he killed only fourteen men in the line of duty, and those because they gave him no choice but to use deadly force. Some fugitives turned themselves in rather than face him when they found out he had their warrant because he always got his man.

The art in this book is wonderful. Christie does well to capture emotion and mood in his art.

This is a great book for any elementary school child who is looking for someone to do a biography on. Nelson includes a photograph of Reeves, vocabulary of western words students may be unfamiliar with, a timeline of Reeves' life, websites to conduct more research, more information about Judge Isaac C Parker and Indian Territory, and a bibliography. All of these things make this an excellent book for the classroom and for home use.


Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Monday, February 4, 2019

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng was published in 2017

Blurb from Barnes and Noble: In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teen daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town--and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides.  Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia's past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs. 

I listened to the audio version of this book that was narrated by Jennifer Lim and enjoyed this story. Ng weaves a story of identity, of how mothers interact with daughters, and how those interactions can create little fires everywhere.

The story begins with Isabelle burning down her family home, and Ng doesn't let go of the reader until the very end. I loved the relationships between Isabelle and Mia and Pearl and Elena. I loved Mia's art and the role it plays in the story. There is symbolism and connections throughout the story. I look forward to reading this one again to pick up all the pieces I missed while trying to figure things out. This book shows that often we don't see what we have until it is nearly too late.


Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Sunday, February 3, 2019

A Map of Days by Ransom Riggs

A Map of Days by Ransom Riggs was published in 2018 and is the fourth book of Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children. I read this in one sitting and stayed up way too late to do so. In this installment, Jacob has gone home to Florida, but his parents think he's lost his mind and are going to have him committed to a mental hospital.

Miss Peregrine and her charges come to his rescue and now they all must fight battles in current day and past America. Of course there are still time loops in America, and Jacob learns even more about his grandfather and the dangers he fought for peculiars in America - a place that lacks ymbrynes to protect them. I love the growth in the children as they fight to grow up and become autonomous from the ymbrynes. I like the new characters that are introduced and look forward the next installment.

This series is a perfect Hi/lo series because of the white space, pictures, and content matter for older teens.


Alysen brought over this cute book for the NICU. I love getting Spanish books. It's important for babies to be read to in their home language.



Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Friday, February 1, 2019

Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk

Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk was published in 2017. I enjoyed this book because I learned about Penikese Island off of Massachusetts that was once a leper colony.

I listened to the audio version that was narrated by Jorjeana Marie. The story is told from Crow's point of view. As a newborn, someone tucked her into a boat and sent her out to sea. She drifted to a fictional island off Cuttyhunk and was found by an artist named Osh. He named her Crow because she was hoarse from crying and sounded like a crow.

The people who live on her island refuse to touch or associate with her because they worry she has drifted in from Penikese and is infected with leprosy. This story is Crow's attempt to find her roots.

I liked the growth in her character and in the characters around her. I love learning new things, so I did some research on Penikese. It has served many purposes throughout the years from nature preserve to leper colony, a mental hospital, and a place for troubled youth.

This book is just right for middle grade and middle school readers and the winner of the 2018 Scott O'Dell award for historical fiction.



My friend, Alysen, brought over these cute books for our NICU book project. Thank you so much!



Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Wild Seed by Octavia E. Butler

I've heard many good things about the writing of Octavia Butler, so I finally read one of her works; it definitely won't be my last. Wild Seed which was first published in 1980, and this genre bending book is a combination science fiction/fairy tale.

Blurb from the back of the book: Anyanwu is all that is female: She can birth tribes, heal with kisses, and transform into anything she forces herself to be. Doro is all that is male: He possesses, seduces, hunts, and kills, raising armies and bending empires to his will. One cannot die, the other cannot be killed. They are all that is human and far more.

What happens when a man who cannot die and has lived for thousands of years meets a 300 year-old shape-shifter woman who can heal herself almost immediately? What happens if this man sees in her a woman he can breed with to create a super race with human controlling powers?

I loved this story because I loved Anyanwu. She is kind, good, a healer, but she can be ferocious when she needs to be. This story made me wonder what I would change myself to be if I could be anything - what would be my natural state? This story shows how women are often controlled by pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood. This is a story of power and of rights and how the imbalance of power effects rights.

This story also reminds me of the cult I left as teen. Doro is all about inbreeding to create his master race just as the cult of my childhood was. I found myself, with pencil in hand, annotating all through this book.

Quotes I liked:

"Sometimes, one must become a master to avoid becoming a slave" (10).

"I have seen that people must be their own gods and make their own good fortune. The bad will come or not come anyway" (20).

"People often hesitated to challenge a man who seemed important and purposeful" (28).

"Though she came from a culture in which wives literally belonged to their husbands, she had power and her power had made her independent, accustomed to being her own person. She did not yet realize that she had walked away from that independence when she walked away from her people with him" (29).

"But once she was isolated in America with an infant to care for, she would learn submissiveness" (29).

"She sought to make him value her and care for her. Thus she might have some leverage with him, some control over him later when she needed it. Much married as she was, she knew she would eventually need it" (33).

When Doro is upset that she travels in the body of a man, she says, "People will think before they attack a man - even a small man. And they will not become as angry if a man gives them a beating" (41).

"Civilization is the way one's own people live. Savagery is the way foreigners live" (110).






Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Maggie donated these books to the NICU along with a box of books for local Little Free Libraries. Thank you, Maggie. 



Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Friday, January 25, 2019

The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

I enjoy reading early science fiction to see how authors from the past visualized
 one supposed future. The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells was published way back in 1898, before flight, before we knew what was on Mars, before travel to the stars, and yet Wells does a good job on incorporating the science of the time into a quite frightening story.

I listened to the audio version of the story that is narrated by one of my favorites, Christopher Hurt.


The story begins with a large cylinder falling to earth and the townspeople try to figure out what it is. British colonization is seen as a theme of the story, but now something new has come to colonize earth.

More and more cylinders fall to earth, and the Martians kill and feed on the humans. Blurb from the back of the book: Thirty-five million miles into space, a species of Martians sets eyes on the planet Earth. With their own planet doomed for destruction, the Martians prepare to invade. Their weapons are ready and their aim is ruthless. The war of the world is about to begin.




Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

A Way of His Own by T.A Dyer

A Way of His Own by T.A Dyer was published in 1981. This book reminds me of Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel only written for middle grade instead of adults. The story follows an ancient family. Shutok, the main character, has some type of physical injury that makes it hard for him to walk. His back and legs ache all the time, and often when his family travels, he has to crawl. Because his family migrates to where they can find game, he is often traveling alone.

His family sees his ailment as an evil spirit, and they don't want that evil spirit to infect them and plan to abandon him. Shutok must find a way to save his own life because of the belief system of his family. Shutok finds an unexpected friend in a captured slave from another clan, and with her help, he may survive his family's superstitions.





Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand was published in 1943. I listened to the audio version which was narrated by the amazing Christopher Hurt.

This 679 page saga follows Howard Roarke after his expulsion from architect school. Howard Roarke is a man who stands up for what he believes in. He is expelled from school because he wants to take architecture into the future instead of designing things that look like the past. The story is set from the 1920s into the late 1930s.

Roarke goes to work for his idol and learns that business is hard for those who refuse to change their belief system. He struggles to support himself because he won't alter his designs to suit public opinion. The story also follows Roarke's classmate Peter Keating, a man with looks and charm but little talent as an architect.

This story shows how public opinion can make or break a career. With Keating soaring to the top and Roarke falling even though Roarke has more talent.

Roarke is generally a good hero. He is strong, works hard, sticks to his principles, with the exception of Rand writing him completely out of character and having him commit rape. As a reader, when a writer does something that a character would not do, I just disregard it. The rape makes sense in fueling Dominique's anger, but her anger doesn't really seem like anger, so I'll disregard it.

There are many parts of the story that made me want to be a better person. To write without worrying about what my readers will think. To create my own art without worrying about public opinion. Dominique was one messed up woman and I struggled to understand her. I liked the changes in Gail Wynand and found Tooehy a worm of a man.

Well worth the listen or the read.




Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Monday, January 21, 2019

Counting Wolves by Michael F. Stewart

Counting Wolves by Michael F. Stewart was published in 2017 and from the blurb on the back, I wasn't sure what to expect of this book - was it complete fantasy or would it be about  mental illness?

Goodreads blurb:

Milly’s evil stepmother commits her to a pediatric psych ward. That’s just what the wolf wants. With bunk mates like Red, who’s spiraling out of control; Pig, a fire-bug who claims Milly as her own—but just wants extra dessert—Vanet, a manic teen masquerading as a fairy godmother with wish-granting powers as likely to kill as to help; and the mysterious Wolfgang, rumored to roam for blood at night; it doesn’t take long for Milly to realize that only her dead mother’s book of tales can save her.

But Milly’s spells of protection weaken as her wolf stalks the hospital corridors. The ward’s a Dark Wood, and she’s not alone. As her power crumbles, she must let go of her magic and discover new weapons if she is to transform from hunted to hunter.



Stewart did a good job trying to unravel the stigma that surrounds mental illness. The nurse says, "No one here is crazy. You should have realized that by now. You have nothing to prove. You come here when you are sick. You leave here when you are better" (205).

Milly is concerned about the stigma of being in a psych ward. She misses her phone that allows her to communicate without counting. Milly has to count to a hundred before she can speak, eat, or go through a doorway. It's her magic spell that keeps the wolf from devouring her. She knows her magic works, but the counting spell is driving everyone away from her and making her sick in the process. 

Steward does a good job incorporating fairy tales into Milly's story, and I liked the role the book of fairy tales plays with Milly's mind. 

This is a story about finding your truth - that is almost constantly changing as the players figure out what is real. It is also a story about facing your truths and fighting your wolves - wolves we all have. 



Quotes I liked:

"What's wrong? But I'm not ready to share that, even if it isn't my fault, even if it's common and no one should care. I know they do. I do" (100). When speaking of the stigma of mental illness.

"Maybe she's forgiven me for not being there when she woke up in the dark, ready to say goodbye, and only found the wolf there to take her" (123).

"She wouldn't be the first person to mistake Jesus for the prince with true love's kiss" (125).

Although I won't share the last paragraph of this book, it is one of the best ending paragraphs ever. It gives the reader the courage and strength to keep breathing, fighting, and trying. 

This book would work well as a Hi/Lo book. The content is fast paced, interesting to teens, there is plenty of white space on the page, and the cover is awesome and incorporates many things from the story. 

I wish the book had been longer, but the length of 217 pages is perfect for Hi/Lo readers. 


Read to a child today even if that child is you. 

Jamie Nilson sent a box of books for our book project. Some of these will go to the NICU and the rest will go to local Little Free Libraries. Thank you so much, Jamie for helping our book drive. 





Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.


Thursday, January 17, 2019

Silver Seeds by Paul Paolilli and Dan Brewer

I collect poetry books, and Silver Seeds written by Paul Paolilli and Dan Brewer and illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher is a beautiful addition to my collection. Published in 2001, each page has a word written vertically, and the first word of each line begins with the letter.

For instance:

Down goes the moon
And up come the sun,
Welcoming the
New day.

Folds and Folds
Of soft spun sugar, like a soft
Gray blanket over the land

Huge elephants
In a row,
Lying
Low and
Sleeping.

Each poem has something to do with nature, and the pictures are beautiful. I only wish it was twice as long.



Sarah sent these books for the NICU book project. Thank you, Sarah.

Hollie and Tanya brought this group of books over for the NICU book project. I appreciate everyone who contributes to our book project. Thank you.


Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Griffin and Sabine: An Extraordinary Correspondence by Nick Bantock

On a recent visit to a local thrift shop, I found the book Griffin and Sabine: An Extraordinary Correspondence by Nick Bantock for 50 cents and it is in like new condition. I also found out it is the first of six books. I want to finish this artsy series, so I'll be on the hunt for the next five.

This book was published in 1991. Every page is a work of art featuring a post card or letter with art on it. The letters are in envelopes and you actually have to take them out, unfold them and read to continue the story.

The story begins with a fan contacting an artist. The fan, Sabine is also an artist, and the two begin a correspondence, which leads to their friendship; only there is a twist and it ends with a mystery, so you can see why I need the next books.

The art alone is one reason to purchase this book. This is a quick read that looks more like a picture book, but it isn't for children.






Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.

Read to a child today even if that child is you. 

Monday, January 7, 2019

2018 Totals NICU Book Project

I started collecting books in 2014 for the NICU where my daughter works to honor the lives of my own twins and also of two grandchildren who did not survive pregnancy. As a reading teacher, I saw that children who were read to, had better attention spans and did better in school. It took me a year to gather 150 books sorted into packets of 5 books each. I delivered them in September of 2015. I had only planned on making this one donation, but the books were so needed by the parents, that I kept on gathering books.



Other people started donating books so we could attempt to make sure every baby went home with a packet of books. Parents read these books to their babies during their often lengthy stays, helping their baby's brains and creating bonding moments full of love. 

Here are two boxes of packets ready to go:


Each packet has a half sheet handout explaining why it is important to read to your baby. I put at least one board book in each packet, and we also create packets for families whose first language is Spanish. 

This year we had 1,630 books donated to the NICU. I purchased 613 of them, so that means over 1,000 books came from friends of our NICU book project. My sweet mom donates all the two-gallon zipper bags. 

Our 2018 donors are:
Michelle Schwendiman
Cayli and Brandon Johnson
Christy Tucker
Michelle Bulow
Valarie Schemk
Meredith Malan
McKay Dee Hospital Foundation
Child Life Services at McKay Dee Hospital
Tanya and Hollie
Alysen Jeffries
Sharon Hall
Krista Young
IHC
Britney Shaw
Rolean Peterson
Angela Jensen
Caitie Jolley
Marla Daniels
Jacki Simper
Angie Moore
Janet Gleue
The Other Side Thrift Boutique
Usborne Book Drive
Cami Allen
Heidi Voorhees
Heidi Crezee
Michelle Horne
Liam Gregory's Wish List
269 books came from Anonymous donors.

In 2018, we gave 42 packets to Jordan Valley Hosptial and 284 packets to McKay Dee Hospital. I believe we were able to serve almost every baby who spent time in McKay Dee's NICU. We may have missed a few, but with your help, we are getting close to helping every single baby at the McKay Dee NICU begin their reading journey. 

We've had two donations so far this year, 2019:

Michelle S brought these books over:

My mom, Rolean, donated another 100 two-gallon bags to help keep the books safe at bedside:

Read to a child today even if that child is you.

Link to our NICU book registry if you'd like to donate books to babies in the newborn intensive care unit so their parents can read to them while they grow. You can also donate gently used books to our project by sending them to me or to Angie. Email me for a mailing address. We can use both English and Spanish books. If you have a graduate of the NICU, or if you have a baby whose life you would like to honor by donating books to this project, let me know, and I can make a book plate with their name for the books you donate.